Chiang Sauce

hans-zimmer

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Not much needs be said about Hans Zimmer. If you’ve watched any movies in the past 20-30 years, you’ve likely heard a soundtrack directly from his fingertips or from an artist who’s whole style has been influenced by his work. For someone who spends most of his time working literally behind a scene, a “revealed” tour like this is no joke.

 

His world tour has already passed through Europe, with a short stop at Coachella Valley in April (if you were there, then you know). The Shrine presents a much more intimate scene than the desert, however. Don’t miss out come August 11th.

 

 

 

 

OE17_Earth_Line-Up-1

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Just as the sun rises, so too does Oregon Eclipse near. With 7 stages each boasting a lineup worthy of an entire festival, we’ve decided it wise to feature our top picks by stage. Some we love. Some we just discovered. All essential.
Click here for more from this series.
35 Days

 

The Earth stage, just as its namesake might suggest, features a melting pot of World, Electronica, Dub, Psychedelia, Instrumental, Classical, and Ambient all tied up with a grounded essence. This is the stage to come back down to.

 

Phaelah

Phaelah‘s breakbeat-cum-balearic minimalist machinations have a place all their own. His sets flow through a multitude of garage, electronica, and house soundscapes while maintaining a spatial beauty that provides a fine soundtrack for a cinematic journey into Self.

 

SaQi

SaQi produces reggae, jazz, and hip-hop infused World/Dub; his live trumpeting adds an extra element of sexy smooth. As is customary with many of the artists on Jumpsuit Records, he’s got plenty of vocal features on his work so expect this to be quite a show.

 

Living Light

By name, Eartha Harris, is an almost synchronism for this stage. As Living Light, she uses symphonic psychedelia to create uptempo ambient soundscapes. Her use of hopeful melodies and ambient soundscapes also lends to spiritual swaying.

 

PLANTRAE

Oregon’s Plantrae is known for a unique atmosphere driven by bass and beautified by viola. The grace of the spaces he creates has a distinct serenity fueled by the intensity of emotion via his live acoustics. Suffice to say, it is a sound and experience to behold.

 

Mirror System

As Mirror System, the duo behind the also Sun Stage-present System 7 (Steve Hillage and Miquette Giraudy) get more in touch with their techy-downtempo sides. The result is an ambiance that is akin to soul-gazing. We suggest you lay down and stare at clouds or maintaining a deep eye-locked connection during their set.

 

Sun:Monx

Sun:Monx is formed by the powerhouse duo of Opiuo and Austero. They each bring their taste and skill in glitch, bass, and dub to the table to create some of the most funky festival dance instrumentalism. Don’t miss out on either of their own appearances either!

 

Hideyo Blackmoon

The sacred spaces of Japan’s Hideyo Blackmoon are designed to induce a sort of healing meditative state with native tongue over depth of sound. She’s also performed at 6 Total Eclipses throughout her career, so she’s right at home in this element.

 

 

OE17_mooon

FULL POST

Just as the sun rises, so too does Oregon Eclipse near. With 7 stages each boasting a lineup worthy of an entire festival, we’ve decided it wise to feature our top picks by stage. Some we love. Some we just discovered. All essential.
Click here for more from this series.
50 Days

 

Second up in our teaser series: The MOOOON. This stage features enough glitch and bass to make us question if we really are cogs in the matrix. Come August, we’ll definitely be a part of a whole under the wobbly Moon.

 

Machinedrum

To experience Machinedrum is to experience a masterfully crafted foray into jungle, beat, glitch, footwork, and drum & bass all at once. Travis Stewart has spent the better part of 20 years playing around all sides of the industry and his sound certainly shows it.

 

Thriftworks

Berkeley’s Jake Atlas, or Thriftworks, is one of the most industrious producers in the downtempo dubstep and glitch scene. Since 2010, he’s put out 14 LPs and EPs totalling over 150 tracks. And that’s just stuff released. His sets are uniquely paced and well worth the time.

 

CloZee

The worldly elements that French native CloZee adds to her glitch foundation helps create a unique soundscape: a blend of organic nomadic sounds and the hiccupyy roughness of electronica. Together it creates a tonality by which to easily get lost in.

 

Tsuruda

Having been born directly into music, Tsuruda has developed a deep understanding of theory. He ventures into experimental beats and bass to create an amalgamation of sound that is purposefully discordant yet jazzy and romantic.

 

EPROM

Eprom really needs no introduction. He’s had a steady rise through the music ranks since 2007. His bassy sound has evolved alongside him, never losing its frenetic nature, but rather always growing in the complexity and depths of glitch and drum & bass.

 

Huxley Anne

Rising LA star Huxley Anne has been spending much of her 2017 in the LA beat scene mastering her own unique style of moody, scratchy beats. The eeriness of it has a mysterious appeal that’s best seen live.

 

K+Lab

A dash of funk on top of layers of Drum & Bass and the makings of K+Lab are clearly evident. You can be sure his set will be a dance party will all the right amounts of whimsy.

 

 

NNMF-Controlaltdelight

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Northern Nights

 

NorCal’s boutique electronic festival, Northern Nights, turns 5 in the coming weeks. Having been before, we can say it is a splendid festival experience. The event organization in itself is something to behold; never a rush, never too far to go, never too crowded, and just right temperature-wise.

 

This years lineup boasts return acts in the glitch, bass, beats, and house scene as well as newcomers and well-deserved features. Justin Jay will definitely bring the house party vibes with his Fantastic Voyage team, The Range will have you swaying to his masterful beat-making, Moon Boots will have you disco bouncing, and G Jones will bring you right back down with all the heavy bass. Of course, the number one rule of music festivals is to follow whatever sound appeals to you – so get out there and find something new. The River stage chill zone is perfect for just that. To top it all off, one of our very own is on the bill; check out Starfari for scinematic soundscapes as you soak in the fresh NorCal vibes!

 

 

In terms of logistics, we recommend getting their early to get yourself a good campsite and that coveted “finally-made-it” excitement. Be sure to check out the Village areas throughout the day and night to get in on yoga and camp activities (or spend your time lifted by the 215 Lounge)! Remember to pack warm clothes as it can get quite chilly once the sun settles over that awe-inspiring Redwood Canopy.

 

 

 

OE17-Sun_Line-Up_LAUNCH

FULL POST

Just as the sun rises, so too does Oregon Eclipse near. With 7 stages each boasting a lineup worthy of an entire festival, we’ve decided it wise to feature our top picks by stage. Some we love. Some we just discovered. All essential.
Click here for more from this series.
75 Days

 

To start the series off, we begin with the Sun Stage’s smattering of psychedelic or Goa trance and all of its unrelenting drive and experimentation.

 

Marcus Henriksson

Marcus Henriksson is one half of Minilogue and Son Kite (the other half is Sebastian Muellert, in case you were wondering). Under the Son Kite moniker, they delved into the ambient spheres of psytrance. Now he also produces under the moniker Nobody Home. Suffice it to say, he is a legend in the scene and will definitely bring a lot of influence to his set.

 

Dark Whisper

Throw hints of world music and poignant commentary into psy-trance and you get Dark Whisper‘s messages of juxtaposition and self examination. Music and enlightenment are all we’ve ever asked for; come August we need just be.

 

Antix

The brother duo of Antix and Fiord are no strangers to the entire musical spectrum from dancefloor trance to dark psytech. Their DJ appearances definitely give light to this.

 

Perfect Ace

Perfect Stranger and Ace Ventura are perhaps the busiest DJ’s on the psytrance circuit and regulars of Symbiosis. Together, you can be sure they’ll be putting on a spectacle.

 

Shadow Fx

If you find yourself wandering the grounds in the wee hours, listen for the mellower melodies of Shadow Fx. His steadier and deeper progressive style is often reserved for the select few that are on the sunrise hustle.

 

Hallucinogen

Simon Posford’s (of Shpongle fame) Hallucinogen alias is one of the most influential leaders of the Psy-trance movement. This is a DJ set so expect to hear the evolution of the genre during it.

 

Killerwatts

Killerwatts is Tristan and Avalon. The duo has seen their share of Psytrance and all of its nested styles. They’ve made sure to keep all of the driving basslines that define it while adding their own prominent flair. Be sure to catch them both during their solo sets!

 

 

jai-wolf-starlight

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Jai Wolf’s newest track featuring Mr. Gabriel calls to form his 2016 breakout hit – Indian Summer. Both call to mind the triumph of setting forth into the great expanse. Starlight incorporates the vocals of Mr. Gabriel to drive the “explore-some-more” point further. And we’re all about ‘splorin.

 

Be sure to catch him at Coachella!

 

Jai Wolf – Starlight ft. Mr Gabriel

Jai Wolf – Kindred Spirits EP

 

 

Big-Wild-Press-Shot-1

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Big Wild | Soundcloud | Buy Invincible

 

This Friday, one of my biggest inspirations makes his way to San Francisco’s Regency Ballroom. Jackson is a hell of a dude, and his music has a very unique way of giving you energy while immersing you in a plethora of synths in a drum-filled frenzy. Check out what he had to say about his path and process so far:

 

 

C+A+D: Let’s start with how I found out about you, through Odesza and when you opened for them about 2 years ago at SXSW. How did that relationship come about and how do you think that made a change to your career?

 

Big Wild: Our relationship definitely helped a lot, because there’s a lot of crossover between their music and my music. Odesza’s fans were able to connect with their music and they become my fans too. It was just a really beneficial relationship for both parts. It’s been cool to get tips and advice from them. Not to mention working with Foreign Family. It was a big difference maker in pushing me to where I am today.

 

C+A+D: The invincible EP is a perfect summation of you and how your sound developed over the years…My favorite song is between Empty Room and Invincible, which are unmistakably you. What was the most challenging part of putting this EP together? Where did you see the most improvement to your process?

 

Big Wild: The hardest part about it was just its completion. I had been working on some of these songs for over a year; on and off. It’s really easy to run into roadblocks or writers-block. Through this process, I’ve made changes on how I make music now, so I can make music a lot faster than before.

 

There would be times when I didn’t know how to make the drop hit harder…or how to tweak this or that. I think that was the hardest part. Accepting that I could keep making changes to the song forever, and it’s never going to be perfect, and to just finish it. That’s a really big part of putting together any kind of project, EP, or even a single. Just knowing when to say, “OK. I’m not really improving the song. I’m just making it sound different.” And that’s crucial.

 

C+A+D: What other equipment makes up your live rig? Did you evolve your rig from a more basic set up, or has it remained the same since you began performing

 

Big Wild: I really try to focus on not piling up a bunch of gear and keeping it fairly minimal. I don’t want to clutter my stage with gear and separate me from the crowd. My set up over time has pretty much the same amount of things. I used to use a nord keyboard but on this tour I’m using a keyboard that also triggers samples off my computer as well. I’m happy with how it brings my songs to life in front of a crowd.

 

C+A+D: If you had a time machine and were able to talk to yourself before your first show as Big Wild, what advice would you give?

 

Big Wild: Oh that’s a good question. *thinks for a few seconds* If I had to give myself advice, it would be not to overthink everything. Don’t make music more complicated than it needs to be, because I definitely tend to do that. Another thing is to understand the importance of different elements in all types of music and why people would like those things.

 

For example, when I started out I was really into hip hop. I would make hip hop instrumentals, and I was 100% all about producing. That’s what I was listening to and focusing on in songs. By doing that I wasn’t focusing as much on vocals, or what type of voice this needs, or what the lyrics are. When I first started out, because I didn’t pay attention to that, I had holes in my musicianship. When I would go to make a song and try to focus on vocals or a lead instrument, it would be really difficult.

 

It’s important to not get sucked into one part of a song, and focus on all the parts; like the melody of the vocals for example. Understand what goes into making a FULL song, rather than get too obsessed on one specific part of a song. Which I guess goes back to not overthinking it. These are all things that were goals for me on this EP. Get involved with writing the lyrics. Get involved with writing the melody for the singers. Work on these other things that I never cared much about, but now I’m very much into. This EP was a learning experience for that, and I’m at peace with how it came out.